Munich Center

Viktualienmarkt

The Viktualienmarkt is a daily food market in the city center of Munich. Over the years, the market has evolved from a farmers market to a popular one for fresh food and exotic groceries that are not available anywhere else in the area. 140 stalls and shops offering flowers and plants, fruits and vegetables, venison and fowl, eggs, butter, honey, fish, meat, sausages, herbs, spices, wine and tea are assembled on an area covering 22,000 square metres. The official opening hours are Monday to Saturday 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. Lastly, the Viktualienmarkt includes a Biergarten with traditional bavarian Food.

 

St. Peter (“Church of St. Peter”)

The Church of St.Peter is one of Munich’s landmarks and is known by the locals as Alter Peter (“Old Peter”). After climbing the 299 steps of St. Peter’s church, you have a beautiful view over the entire city center and the area surrounding it. And when the weather is good, the view even reaches all the way to the Alps.  The church has been built in the 11th century; over the course of time it has been rebuilt and expanded several times. This explains the various styles in the works of art that can be found inside the church.

 

Marienplatz

Marienplatz is the heart of the city of Munich. In the Middle Ages, the square used to be a market place as well as the site where tournaments and festivities took place. The large column at the center of the square is known as the column of St. Mary. It was erected in 1638 to celebrate the end of the Swedish invasion. At 11, 12 and 17 o’clock each day, visitors can watch the famous “Glockenspiel” or carillon. The figures perform the “Schäfferltanz” or Cooper’s dance, which was originally performed in 1517 at the Marienplatz to commemorate the end of the plague. The original Old Town Hall or “Altes Rathaus” was completely destroyed by fire in 1460. Between 1470 and 1480, the old town hall was rebuilt in Gothic style. The building was destroyed once again during the Second World War, but rebuilt afterwards following the original fifteenth-century plans.